Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson Casle Inc. - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
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Casle Inc. - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
Casle Inc. - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
Casle Inc. - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
  Research shows the benefits of learning Sign for hearing kids are many. In fact, the benefits are so numerous that one has to wonder if perhaps a Sign language should be the second language that hearing kids learn. There are those who feel that learning a Sign language develops more of the brain than learning a spoken language. When learning one or more spoken languages the information is taken in, processed, and stored in a small area of the brain's left hemisphere. But when learning a Sign language the visual information is taken in by the right hemisphere, and then transferred for processing and storage to the left hemisphere. Dr. Marilyn Daniels likes to point out that learning a spoken language only uses the mouth and ears, but learning a Sign language as a second language utilizes the hands and eyes in addition to the ears and mouth.

Quite a few studies have concluded Sign can improve hearing kids' reading. Many children learning to read have to stop often when they get confused upon encountering words they don't know the meaning of. Learning to read can become frustrating, which it shouldn't be. Learning Sign may help improve reading because when kids learn a word in conjunction with a sign they are more likely to remember the meaning of the word. With a larger vocabulary kids stop less often when learning to read, so learning to read is less frustrating, and more of what it should be - interesting, perhaps even fun.

Casle Inc. - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson

Teachers who simultaneously speak and Sign lessons often do so because hearing kids have such a fascination with Sign that they pay greater attention to what is being taught. Research on the use of ASL in regular classrooms has found that the students who received sign language instruction had significantly higher scores on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) than the students who didn’t receive sign language instruction. (Daniels, 1996b) Another study by Daniels (1996a) investigated the effects of using ASL on the language acquisition and literacy development of seventeen students in a kindergarten class who received sign language instruction and tested higher than seventeen students in another kindergarten class who didn’t receive sign language instruction. The study showed that the effect of enriching the kindergarten curriculum with ASL improves hearing children’s vocabulary substantially.

Casle Inc. - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson

A "verbal linguistic" child loves the process of learning another language. The "kinesthetic" child is motivated naturally by movement. The "interpersonal" child loves being involved in a group activity. The benefit of using this system is the representation of information through seeing, hearing, and movement. The more pathways created in the brain, the stronger the memory. In addition, teachers are observing that children are interested in sign language and tend to acquire it easily.

The use of sign language and fingerspelling is one of the many strategies that can be used to engage the young reader in developing early literacy skills. It is successful with learners of all types and levels. Patrice Wolf, author of Brain Matters, states, "The most powerful strategies increase retention, understanding and students' abilities to apply the concepts they are learning." The use of sign language and fingerspelling puts reading "in the hands" of children.

Daniels said that sign language is also effective in managing the classroom and for discipline. She demonstrated the sign for "stop," which resembles a tomahawk chop into the palm of the opposite hand. Instead of a teacher vocally admonishing a student in front of the whole class, the teacher can "tell" a student to stop in a quiet and non-judgmental way. She said sign language allows a student to be disciplined without the whole class knowing.

In conclusion, the benefits are numerous and most importantly, the children truly LOVE learning sign!



Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson  
Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
Casle Inc - Children & American Sign Language For Education - Debra Aronson
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